3 Teas that Steep Up Best by the Potful

Originally posted on Tea Blog:

You probably have a teapot…or two…or three…or a whole bevy! So, why not put them to good use steeping up teas that are so enticing that you can drink them by the potful? “Great idea!” you say. I think so, too.

Awhile back I wrote an article about “gulper teas” that could be drunk by generous mouthfuls instead of dainty sips. Then, I wrote  another article, this time about “gulper teas to start your day.” These teas are all good to steep by the potful for several reasons:

Ti Kuan Yin Iron Goddess Oolong Tea can be steeped gongfu style or is great by the potful. (Photo source: A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)
Ti Kuan Yin Iron Goddess Oolong Tea can be steeped gongfu style or is great by the potful. (Photo source: A.C. Cargill, all rights reserved)
  • You will want at least two cupfuls.
  • Your spouse will want at least two cupfuls.
  • Your guests will want at least two cupfuls.
  • Your kids and other relatives will want at least two cupfuls.
  • The…

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Tea Moments — First Stars

Originally posted on Tea Blog:

“Twilight” isn’t just a series of novels and a TV show about vampires, werewolves, etc. It’s also not just a type of zone where tiny spaceships land on farmhouse rooftops or little boys can wish anything into existence they want. Twilight is a special time of day. A time for a great tea moment as you watch the first stars start to twinkle in the darkening sky.

Some of the beauties you can enjoy in the night sky. (Source: screen capture from site)
Some of the beauties you can enjoy in the night sky. (Source: screen capture from site)

Officially, there are two twilight times: morning twilight is between dawn and sunrise, and evening twilight is between sunset and dusk. The sunlight is subdued, with the spectrum being broken into a rainbow of reds, oranges, purples, and blues. Characteristic of this time is an absence of shadows and where things appear in silhouette. Photographers call this “sweet light,” and painters call it “blue hour.” Evening twilight…

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Tea in the Movies — “Amadeus”

Originally posted on Tea Blog:

Hollywood (translation: people who make movies with the primary intention of earning big bucks) tends to portray tea in a less than favorable light. A good example is from the award-winning (but not for tea) movie “Amadeus.”

Even Emperor Joseph II of Austria would have opted for tea when served from this regal teapot. (Photo source: The English Tea Store)
Even Emperor Joseph II of Austria would have opted for tea when served from this regal teapot. (Photo source: The English Tea Store)

First, this movie is pure drama with a pinch of reality thrown in here and there. There really was a Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. There really was an Italian composer named Antonio Salieri. From there the movie takes the fiction fork in the road, leaving the fact fork far behind. Setting such artistic license aside, we get to the big “tea scene” in the movie.

Picture this: “Wolfie” has, with the blessing of his patron and monarch Emperor Joseph II (known as the musical king), married his landlady’s daughter named Constanze…

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The Other High Tea

Originally posted on Tea Blog:

Earl Grey is always a good choice! (Photo source: The English Tea Store)
Earl Grey is always a good choice! (Photo source: The English Tea Store)

I don’t fly much anymore – not that I miss it. Given the state of commercial air travel these days I’d rather eat my own foot than have to fly somewhere. But some time back, when I was still jetting around every once in awhile, I recall taking a longish flight to somewhere – the details aren’t important.

What stands out in my memory was that the tea selection was decidedly unexceptional, as I was expecting. The best I could manage was a bag of black tea of a brand you’d probably recognize, but which I wouldn’t ever drink in my everyday life. But, given that I’d been without tea for what seemed like an eternity, this otherwise unexceptional variety tasted like an elixir of the gods and I was happy to have it.

Depending on what…

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Teas of the World: Nepalese Teas

Originally posted on Tea Blog:

Never heard of teas from Nepal? Never heard of Nepal? Okay. I understand. They and the country they come from aren’t on everyone’s radar. All the more reason to shine a spotlight on them here.

Nepalese Teas (Photo source: screen capture from site)
Nepalese Teas (Photo source: screen capture from site)

Topography and Teas Grown

Between two tea growing giants (China and India) lies the country of Nepal. Nepal teas are considered comparable to “classic” Darjeeling tea but sell at a more affordable price. This similarity with Darjeeling tea is because the main tea producing regions in eastern Nepal have more or less the same geographical and topographical conditions as the Darjeeling tea growing areas.

The aroma, fusion, taste, and color of these teas are considered superior to those of Darjeeling teas, but their low production quantities cannot meet a high demand and so keep these teas from gaining a big place in the market. The teas are…

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5 Reasons to Use a Kyusu Teapot

Originally posted on Tea Blog:

Recently, I listed why a cast iron teapot, popular in Japan, is a good tea steeping option. Time to look at another teapot style also popular in Japan: the kyusu.

The word “kyusu” means “teapot.” Many have the handle set at a 90-degree angle to the spout. These are yokode kyūsu (横手急須, side hand(le) teapot) and have a side handle and which is the more common type. Some, though, have the spout and handle on opposite sides of the teapot. These are ushirode kyūsu (後手急須, back hand(le) teapot), and are just like teapots in other parts of the world. A third type is uwade kyūsu (上手急須, top hand(le) teapot), where the handle is on top, like it is on the cast-iron teapots.

1 Taste

This ceramic teapot style is specially designed to brew green tea, and more specifically Japanese green teas which have their own unique flavor…

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Tea Blogging for Your Audience

Originally posted on Tea Blog:

Tea blogs abound and, as varied as they are, so are their audiences. Gearing your tea blog to your audience is essential to get the intended readership. (Pardon me, my marketing background is showing.) This is very often forgotten in the excitement of posting your tea adventures online for the world to see.

Tea blogging in video form is becoming more popular. (Photo source: The English Tea Store)
Tea blogging in video form is becoming more popular. (Photo source: The English Tea Store)

What is a blog? The term “blog” is short for “web log” which was supposed to be a post-it-as-you-think-of-it type of writing. Sort of like an online journal or diary. As with many aspects of the Internet, the potential was seen to do a lot more with these blogs than just post your cute kitty or the kids in their Halloween costumes, etc., as much as we all (yes, me, too!) enjoy seeing them. The reach of blogs across a full spectrum…

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